Chronic Illness and Betrayal

Posted by Dr. Reisman on September 23, 2013

When we are diagnosed with a chronic illness, we may want to consider a number of options. After all, these current times are characterized not only by rapid communication via the internet and cell phones. These are also the days in which we are seeing the emergence of all kinds of new insights into health and illness. Science has begun to explode in recent years, offering us a clearer understanding of the functioning of the body and mind than we have ever had before. And yet, amidst this setting of so many new insights, we are also seeing a tremendous rise in the occurrence of chronic illness.

elderly woman staring into the distance

Upon being diagnosed with a chronic illness, there may be some valuable questions to ask about the relationship between you and your life, and in particular, the possibility of betrayal.

One question that may be worthwhile asking has to do with the concept of relationship. Each of us has a unique and private relationship with life. Your life is seen only from your own eyes, with each new personal experience adding to the background of all your past experiences. Of course, you may share as much as you like with others, and there will always be enormous value in doing so. Yet no one can truly know what it is like to be you. No one else can know your entire detailed history and your particular perspective. So upon being diagnosed with a chronic illness, there may be some valuable questions to ask about this relationship, and in particular, the possibility of betrayal.

We know a lot about the elements of human functioning: chemical details regarding the nutritional needs of the cells, mechanical principles regarding the connective tissues used in posture and movement, and electrical flow as the circulation of life force energy throughout the body. All of this puts us in a position to ask more effectively about our living relationship with our living body.

So in the event of having been diagnosed with a chronic illness, we may want to see the body as the living representative of life, and ask gently and courageously, “How might I have felt betrayed by my life, and how might my life have felt betrayed by me?”

The information provided here is for educational purposes only. It is offered as a contribution to a clinical relationship between a patient and a practitioner of health-promoting medicine. It is specifically not meant to substitute for the quality medical intervention and partnership that is the proper means of lifestyle change.

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